We Women

Some of us have been lucky enough to live in the capital we call London. A place where the skyscrapers leave us with a strained neck, whilst the sunset down South Bank produces the prettiest of Instagrammable images.  In other news… 

The #BehindEveryGreatCity campaign initiated by the Mayor of London celebrates the progression of gender equality within the city, it looks to educate and inform inhabitants and travellers from far and wide that the city is a place where revolutionaries collaborated to create change. This change being the right to vote. For women. 2018 celebrates the 100 year anniversary where millions of women were acknowledged for their basic right in expressing their views and political stances. The Representation of the People Act was finally here to give women a chance to use their voice. A chance to be heard. A monumental event generating much cheer, joy and relief amongst the British population. After fighting for years and gaining punishments for their actions, women were given their time to shine. But all of this came at a price, of course. It wouldn’t be politics if exclusion of a particular group didn’t exist, right?

Whilst the piece of legislature changed the face of the electoral, it still had a long way to go. Only women who were 30 years old, owned property, were a member of or married to a member of the Local Government Register or were graduated from university were given the luxury to vote. So, indeed it is fair to state that the beginning of the success was still limited however, ten years later, women regardless of status and those over the age of 21 were granted such a privilege. 1928 was a year of the woman; at last, all “adult” females were now able to act upon their freedom of right to communication by ticking a box for their preferred political party. London was a one stop destination for protests; Trafalgar Square was often a tremendous site to see; women and men gathering in unison to fight for gender equality; which is why department stores such as Harvey Nichols, Harrods and Fortnum & Masons have supported the #BehindEveryGreatCity campaign. Smashing their windows and presenting breathtaking and spine chilling visual displays that portray the true dedication and commitment women expressed a century ago.

There was a true struggle in attaining the same rights as men, from the Matrimonial Act of 1937 to the Equal Pay Act of 1970, females across Britain waited several decades before receiving the rights that they were entitled to. The Equal Pay Act being introduced in the 1970’s can be difficult to grasp; did our grandparents and perhaps even parents really experience this indifference and discrimination? Although April 4th 2018 saw the press deconstructing prolific businesses and their gender pay gap, it is promising to see that these three department stores are supporting the progression and status of women in business. Harvey Nichols’ board members comprise of a female majority, Fortnum & Mason’s management team are 65% women whilst Harrods offers specific business courses for females – to be the boss ass bitches they deserve to be. These are three of many who are striving to ensure that equality exists in the workplace and thanks to these companies, women are left with hope for their future. However, recent magnification of the term equality is now driving debate with regards to considering all types of equality and how businesses need to take factors such as ethnicity and age into consideration, before claiming their establishments are fully promoting the “equal” rhetoric. That’s another topic of discussion for another day.

Here’s to our women.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s